Ribeye Steaks – Meat Cut Highlight

Bone-In Ribeye Steak

 

Beef steak is one of my favorite things for dinner. I prefer mine cooked medium with a juicy, warm pink center. The melt in your mouth goodness brings me back to my childhood farm. Steak has been a regular thing on the menu for me most of my life. Growing up on a beef farm means that there is always some steak, roast or other beef cuts in the freezer.  I will admit, I haven’t always been the best at cooking steaks but the delicious flavor has always been there. Preparing and cooking grass-fed steaks is an art form and it definitely has a learning curve. While I enjoy all of the steak cuts, nothing quite compares to a meaty Ribeye.

 

Primal Cut, Beef Prime Rib Roast – Bone-In

 

The Ribeye steak is cut from the rib primal cut of the beef. This section of beef typically spans 7 ribs (6 – 12). A rib steak, ribeye steak and a prime rib roast are all basically the same cut of beef. When left in roast form and served at Christmas dinner, it is usually cooked in the oven. When this primal cut is individually sliced between the ribs it becomes a steak and it’s amazing on the grill or broiled.

 

 

Boneless Ribeye Steaks

 

Ribeye steaks have other names as well, one being Delmonico. Delmonico’s was a very popular restaurant in New York City in the mid-19th century. Some people think they served a New York Strip steak, while others seem to think it was a thick cut Ribeye steak.  No matter the controversy, as to what steak the term Delmonico is actually referring to, most seem to use the term Delmonico interchangeably with Ribeye. No matter what you call it, the Ribeye steak can be one of the best steaks you’ve ever eaten.

 

 

Bone-In Ribeye Steaks

 

The steaks can be cut with the bone removed or can be cut with the bone in. It is a flavorful and tender cut of meat because it comes from the lightly worked upper rib cage area. Marbling, the small lines of fat prevalent in the Ribeye steak, add extra flavor and tenderness. Steaks that are closer to the head have more abundant marbling and a larger layer of fat around the leaner portion of meat. During the cooking process, the robust buttery flavored fat melts and bastes the meat from the inside.

 

Boneless Ribeye Steaks

 

When choosing how done you would like your steak, there are a few tips to help you cook the perfect steak. Be sure to use a meat thermometer, my favorite is this digital one from Amazon. It is very easy to use and effective.  When you are checking your steaks’ internal temperature, be sure to NOT insert your thermometer into the fat or touching the bone. Remove your steaks when the thermometer registers 5 degrees F  lower than the desired doneness. Rest your steaks. The internal temperature will continue to rise for several minutes after they are removed from the grill.  Resting your steak locks in the natural juices of your steak. It is best to rest your steak at least 5 minutes before serving to ensure a juicier, tastier cut of beef.

 

Doneness & Internal Temperature Guide

Rare – Cool Red Center, 125 degrees F.

Medium Rare – Warm Red Center, 135 degrees F.

Medium – Warm Pink Center, 145 degrees F.

Medium Well – Slightly Pink Center, 150 degrees F.

Well Done – Little or No Pink – 160 degrees F.